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* Mars at OppositionMars at Opposition

The red planet will be at its closest approach to Earth and its face will be fully illuminated by the Sun. This is the best time to view and photograph Mars. A medium-sized telescope will allow you to see some of the dark details on the planet's orange surface. You may even be able to see one or both of the bright white polar ice caps.

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* Total Lunar EclipseTotal Lunar Eclipse

A total lunar eclipse occurs when the Moon passes completely through the Earth's dark shadow, or umbra. During this type of eclipse, the Moon will gradually get darker and then take on a rusty or blood red color. The eclipse will be visible throughout most of North America, South America, and Australia

* Full MoonFull Moon

The Moon will be directly opposite the Earth from the Sun and will be fully illuminated as seen from Earth. This phase occurs at 07:42 UTC. This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Pink Moon because it marked the appearance of the moss pink, or wild ground phlox, which is one of the first spring flowers. This moon has also been known as the Sprouting Grass Moon and the Growing Moon.

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* Beginner ClassBeginner Class

We’re happy to offer beginner astronomy classes each month by our friendly astronomers. These classes focus on beginning observational astronomy for our newer members of the club and last about 45 minutes.

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* Lyrids Meteor ShowerLyrids Meteor Shower

The Lyrids is an average shower, usually producing about 20 meteors per hour at its peak. It is produced by dust particles left behind by comet C/1861 G1 Thatcher, which was discovered in 1861. The shower runs annually from April 16-25. It peaks this year on the night of the night of the 22nd and morning of the 23rd. These meteors can sometimes produce bright dust trails that last for several seconds. The second quarter moon will be a slight problem this year, blocking the less bright meteors from view. Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight. Meteors will radiate from the constellation Lyra, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

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* Lyrids Meteor ShowerLyrids Meteor Shower

The Lyrids is an average shower, usually producing about 20 meteors per hour at its peak. It is produced by dust particles left behind by comet C/1861 G1 Thatcher, which was discovered in 1861. The shower runs annually from April 16-25. It peaks this year on the night of the night of the 22nd and morning of the 23rd. These meteors can sometimes produce bright dust trails that last for several seconds. The second quarter moon will be a slight problem this year, blocking the less bright meteors from view. Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight. Meteors will radiate from the constellation Lyra, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

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* CCAS MeetingCCAS Meeting

We are having a guest speaker Kent Wallace on constellations and the dark night sky. He's an expert, so you don't want to miss this one!

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* Solar ObservingSolar Observing

Our team of solar astronomers love to share breath-taking viewing of our closest star, the sun! We have special telescopes designed to look at the sun safely so you don’t have to worry. Come one hour before sunset at a Dark Sky Star Party, and you’ll be able to participate!

* Star GazingStar Gazing

Join us for a free star gazing event at sunset!

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* Annular Solar EclipseAnnular Solar Eclipse

An annular solar eclipse occurs when the Moon is too far away from the Earth to completely cover the Sun. This results in a ring of light around the darkened Moon. The Sun's corona is not visible during an annular eclipse. The path of the eclipse will begin off the coast of South Africa and move across Antarctica and into the east coast of Australia.

* New MoonNew Moon

The Moon will be directly between the Earth and the Sun and will not be visible from Earth. This phase occurs at 06:14 UTC. This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

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* Starry NightsStarry Nights

Interested in learning about the night sky? Starry Nights is an outdoor planetarium-style star show at Terrace Hill that lasts approximately 30 minutes, and it’s a great way to get to know the ever-changing night sky. Free, no reservations required. Meets one hour after sunset.

     
Category Key
 Astronomical Event
 Beginner Astronomy Class
 Club Meeting
 Dark Star Party
 Mentoring Program
 Solar Observing Session
 Special Event
 Starry Nights at Terrace Hill